Let's Plant Some Spring Veggies!

Spring Veggie Garden Inspiration Button
Spring Veggie Garden Inspiration Button

*March is just around the corner, which is a great month to plant tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, corn, and more.....yummy!  Growing your own vegetables can be very rewarding for the entire family, and it's never too late to get started if you haven't already!

Proper planting time is important to have maximum quality and production.  Plan to plant as early as possible according to the recommended planting time, so the vegetables will grow and mature during ideal conditions.  What veggies can you plant for our area in March?  See below...

Summer Harvest  by OakleyOriginals/CC BY
Summer Harvest by OakleyOriginals/CC BY

Quick March Veggie Planting Reference:

Optimal Planting Time: EARLY MARCH

~ Beans (seed - lima & snap varieties): March

~ Corn (seed): March - April

~ Tomato (plants): March

Optimal Planting Time: MID-MARCH

~ Cucumber (seed): March - April

~ Eggplant (plants): March - June

~ Cantaloupe (seed): March - June

~ Pepper (plants): March - July

~ Pumpkin (seed): March - mid-July

~ Squash (seed):  March - July

*Vegetables that we should begin planting in April: Okra, peas, sweet potatoes, and watermelon.


**Curious about veggie planting time for the entire year?  Reference: The Montgomery County Vegetable Garden Planting Chart


Here are some specifics about some very easy-to-grow veggies: Tomatoes & Green Beans.

20110419_0004bean by Manuel Noah Angeja/CC BY
20110419_0004bean by Manuel Noah Angeja/CC BY

Planting Green Beans (snap bush, and snap pole):

  • Select a planting site with full sunlight, and well-drained soil.
  • Set up trellises or tepees before planting.
  • Plant seeds 2 to 4 inches apart and 1 to 1-1/2 inches deep.
  • Avoid allowing the soil to over-dry or crust during germination, but do not over water.
  • Once the bean plants begin to grow provide an even supply of water all season .

 

Harvesting

  • The maturity rate for snap beans is approximately 60-80 days.
  • Pods should be firm and crisp at harvest; the seeds inside should be undeveloped or very small.
  • Hold stem with one hand & pod with the other to avoid pulling off branches that will produce later pickings.
  • Pick all pods to keep plants productive.
Tomato Transplants by Kurt and Sybilla/CC BY
Tomato Transplants by Kurt and Sybilla/CC BY

Planting Tomato Plants (not the seeds):

  • Select a planting site with full sunlight, and well-drained soil.
  • Loosen the soil by using a garden fork or tiller to a depth of 12-15 inches.
  • Set up trellises, cages, or stakes before planting.
  • Dig planting holes 18 to 24 inches apart if you plan to stake or trellis the crops, but 36 to 48 inches apart if the plants aren't trained.
  • Pinch off two or three of the lower branches on the transplant and set the root ball of the plant well into the hole until the remaining lowest leaves are just above the soil surface.
  • Note: the plant will form additional roots along the buried stem.
  • Water generously and keep the plants well watered for a few days.
  • Apply a thick layer of organic mulch 4 or 5 weeks after transplanting, and provide an even supply of water all season.

 

Harvesting

  • The maturity rate for tomatoes are 80 days or slower.
  • For best flavor, harvest tomatoes when they are firm and fully colored.  They will continue to ripen if  you pick them when they are half-ripe and bring them indoors, but the flavor is often better if you allow  tomatoes to ripen on the vine.

**Be sure to keep a close check in your garden for insects and diseases.  We recommend that you use organic methods of insect control versus pesticides. 

Master - Half of the Whole by Distant Hill Garden/CC BY
Master - Half of the Whole by Distant Hill Garden/CC BY

 

We wish you a happy & fruitful harvest!

If you should need assistance with any of your outdoor projects, please don't hesitate to contact us here at Living Expression Landscapes.